ellyssian: (Forever Autumn)
Via crazylegs on BGG, in response to the clip Pixels, which I posted the other day, there as well as here... (if you missed it yesterday, and you have any love at all for things like Pong, Space Invaders, Tetris, and so on and so forth, go back and watch it now!)

ellyssian: (Default)
(aka Awesomeness, in this case)

Via the birthday boy himself...


ellyssian: (sphinx)


DaVinci's Challenge - 2 or 4 players ages 8 and up

The first of three related games (the other two being a modified mancala and a card game), this is an abstract game that requires quick pattern recognition skills as well as strategic thinking.

The board has some of DaVinci's images on them, but they are all in the background. The playing field of the board itself - on top of Vitruvian Man ~ has a series of geometric patterns made up of two shapes. Those two shapes match that of your playing pieces, in both your color and that of your opponent. The four player game ~ which I've never played ~ subdivides the colors into teams, with one player per shape.

The pieces ~ ovals and triangles, they're often called, although it's a slight simplification ~ are made from plastic, and from all reports there is a lot of variation in the quality of molding. I know our set has one mongrel piece that looks like enough material didn't make it into the mold, however, I'm not complaining ~ it seems to bring me a spot of luck!

The game is played by taking turns, placing a piece of your choosing in a location of your choosing that matches the selected piece. After each piece is played, you must see if that added piece became part of one or more patterns, as indicated on the scoring sheet. You make a tally mark next to all of the patterns you completed ~ wholly in your color ~ and it moves on to the next player.

When placing a piece, you have two core strategies: complete a pattern or block your opponent from completing a pattern.

When we've played, we make efforts to stay on one half or the other and complete and recognize as many patterns as possible, so the game doesn't really move into the blocking mechanics until we start running out of space. I'm sure that, under more competitive circumstances, you can just chase each other around, but I'd think that type of game would be rather low scoring, certainly more frustrating, and possibly less fun.

As a fan of pattern recognition, I prefer that aspect of the game, and that is where ~ even with pre-defined sides, and thus an equal chance of coming up with identical scores ~ one's ability to see those patterns quickly makes all the difference.
ellyssian: (sphinx)
I've brought in 8 WUs for 11,981 points, and I've moved up to 113th place in Team Geekdō.

The team itself has moved up to 563rd place, which means it has just overpowered the team from Slashdot (569th place, at the moment).

If anyone has any questions about the proteins being folded, ask [profile] aequitaslevitas. Apparently he is interested in biology. He could look at the molecule the older client on the system downstairs was displaying and identify it and what it was made of. And he was right.

If you have a system to spare, join in the fun by Folding@Home. You can find out more info about Team Geekdō here, and if you play RPGs and/or board games, you already have a Geekdō login, right? =)
ellyssian: (sphinx)


Vineta (domestic edition) - 2 to 6 players ages 10 and up (German edition)

Unless you're a nut like me, the domestic edition of this game will suit you just fine.

Maybe.

If, however, you are a nut, you're going to want to learn to read German and get the international edition, which is to say, the original German edition of the game.

While I can only speak to one of the differences authoritatively, others have reported thiner cardboard used to build the region pieces and some other bits, and a smaller size (which might be an advantage for traveling). What I can say, without question, is this:

The German edition has a board, the newer edition does not.

Region pieces and what difference the absence or presence of a board might make won't make any sense if you aren't already familiar with the game, and if you are familiar with the game, you're probably not reading this, so I expect that, by now, you need some more information about the game so you can figure out which end is up.

The heart of the game is in the 9 regions of the island city of Vineta, the Atlantis of the north. The pieces form a simplistic puzzle ~ three inner regions, three middle regions, and three outer regions. There are a number of little wooden houses that are set out amongst the 9 regions, all in different colors, with one more color (up to seven) than there are players (up to six, of course).

Eight of these 9 regions, and all houses on them, will sink, one by one, below the waves.

Why?

Well, it's simple: some fool in the city has royally ticked off the gods, and they're sending in wave after wave of, well, waves... and eight of the regions are destined to be washed away. By the gods.

And guess who get to play the gods? That's right: Odin, Thor, and the rest of the crew... that's who you're playing as.

Each god secretly favors one of the regions of the city and your followers are housed in one color of those wooden houses. Your goal is to keep as many of your followers safe from the deluge as possible, and, if you can manage it, to make sure your region is the last bit of dry land.

The game plays in eight rounds, and each round results in every player having three (more or less) turns to influence where the waves are, and, through some further intervention, which houses are on the region that will sink at the end of the round.

You play wave cards ~ either targeting a region that is not threatened, or adding to the waves already threatening a region. The region with the most waves at the end of the round sinks. Additional cards give you chances to add huge modifiers for or against a row of waves, or to manipulate houses in a variety of ways ~ moving them from threatened areas, to threatened areas, swapping them, or locking them down. There are also cards that can be played to reduce the number of turns in the round or increase it.

Two complaints that I've heard against this game are 1) that the theme of Norse gods is paper thin; and 2) that there's too much chaos. Obviously, those folks never played D&D where Norse gods were involved. If they had, they'd know the Norse gods are (mostly) chaotic, Chaotic Good, to be specific, for Odin and Thor and (most) friends.

Seriously, if you've ever looked at Norse mythology the gods were larger than life: great power, great might, and, quite often, great oops.

Now, maybe the theme would be more supported if the village was perched on the edge of fjord, and the gods sent avalanches of snow down on the city, but, really, it works quite well with the theme as is...

Overall, I really enjoyed this game. It was wild and chaotic, but it was fun. None of us got to save our own little slice of the city, and I don't think we managed to save any houses, either.

One last word on the German edition vs. the domestic edition: I did notice that the kids really seemed to enjoy looking at the sea monsters that get revealed as each piece of the city goes under the waves, so the extra art is certainly appreciated, and, to my mind, helps make the whole experience more enjoyable.

And, finally, as an added bonus, here's a demo for the game:

ellyssian: (sphinx)


ZERTZ - 2 players ages 12 and up

So simple, so elegant.

Part of the attraction for me in any game is how it looks: if the bits and pieces are interesting, if there's nice art, if, in part, it has a nice theme, and, correspondingly, if that theme is more than surface deep.

Abstract games have the advantage here. The theme is no-theme: it's all about the gameplay. However, the bits and pieces can still be beautiful.

And the gameplay, the other part of the attraction of any game, is there in spades.

There's thought required to play a game like ZERTZ, the third installment of Project GIPF.

Now, I'm no great strategian ~ in fact, I've got a history of being a mediocre chess player at best, and, although my eldest son says I'd always win, I tend to see myself as fairly challenged even at a game of checkers ~ but I really enjoy the times I can see my way through a series of possibilities and correctly determine the way to get things to flow in my favor.

The game of ZERTZ isn't lacking in the looks department. There's no real board, per se, for the hexagonal playing area is constructed out of a series of convex (or, if you played them as we did in the first game, concave...) rings made of a heavyweight plastic ~ good quality feel about them ~ and marbles. The marbles are largish ~ shooter sized, I guess ~ and are beautifully speckled, with white, gray, and black base colors. The marbles have a lot of weight, enough so you might be led to believe that the marbles could, in fact, be made from marble.

To play the game, you have two possible moves you can make: the first is to place a marble from the pool of marbles (or, later in the game, from your own collection of trophies) on to an unoccupied ring and to remove one unoccupied ring from the edge of the board; the second possible move is to jump a marble over one or more marbles on the board, thus capturing the marble(s) you leap over.

Capturing works much like checkers, you can leap in a straight line over any single marble, and, if you can string a bunch together, over any other marbles in the series. If two or more initial jumps in different directions are possible, you have the option of deciding which way to jump. However, the choice to jump is out of your hands: if the move is available, you must take it. One of the strategies that is possible is to force your opponent to make certain captures, thus setting you up in a desired position.

Their are several goals to the game and the first player to achieve one of those goals wins. You need to capture three of each of the three colors of marbles, or capture four out of the five white marbles, or five out of the seven gray, or six out of the nine black marbles.

The first game I played, with Justin, seemed to easy, and it led to an easy strategy, and I rapidly collected all four of the white marbles. The game seemed a bit too easy, and too controllable, and a wee bit shallow of strategy. We reviewed the rules and discovered that ~ oops! ~ we goofed, misread some rules, and were both placing and capturing on the same turn. Of course, this makes for an entirely different game than designed, and, while it does allow some strategic thinking, it pretty much flattens it into a simplistic race without any depth whatsoever.

The second game I played, with Rachel, followed the real, actual rules. Now, as a disclaimer, Rachel can't stand games like this. She likes the ones with the themes well enough, but abstract games in general, and the ones she's played in this series in particular (GIPF itself, and the now-demoted TAMSK) did not entertain her, so it was under some duress, and much puppy dog eyes on my part, as well as providing her the choice of playing ZERTZ or ZERTZ, that I got her to agree to play along.

I almost came to regret that, as I spent most of the game playing catch up, two or three captures behind her, and, seemingly, always setting her up for a capture on her next turn. I had fairly well resigned myself to losing, especially after she managed to succeed on a move I had failed on ~ to isolate a marble on a ring by removing the last ring linking it to the rest of the board.

This method of capturing marbles comes into play not through leaping, but when placing marbles and taking rings from the board. When you take away the rings, you can only remove rings that can be slid away without disturbing any other rings. If you manage to leave an island of one or more marbles, without any open rings, and have it fully separated from the rest of the board, you can claim that marble (and the ring, although that doesn't provide you with any advantage except providing a place to store your captive).

I think Rachel managed to do this twice.

The board was seriously shrinking, and we were already going into our own stock of captures to be able to play, and there weren't many open spots left. On my last move, with Rachel having 5 black marbles (one from winning on that goal), 4 gray marbles (one away on that goal as well), and two white marbles (one away from getting three of each, and two away from winning on the four white marbles), and with me having 4 black, 2 grey, and 2 white, I had to play one of my captives, thus taking me further from the goal.

Luckily, I saw my chance, placed one of the grey down as the point of a three-marble V with another grey and a white, and took the last ring separating them from the rest of the board to complete my move. By doing so, I captured all three marbles, and that provided me with the three-of-each needed to win the game.

The gameplay, when you actually follow the rules, was much more satisfying, and both Rachel and I greatly enjoyed the game.

While it might be a while before I can convince her to play a different abstract game, this might have made that easier, and I'm fairly sure she'll play this one again some time.

I also think I'll need to practice, because I'm not sure I'll stand a chance against her next time...

In the overall scope of the Project, it looks like the edition of the game that I have ~ a few years old, and it has changed publishers since ~ includes some of the ZERTZ potentials to play in a game of GIPF. I still haven't experimented with adding any additional potentials. These pieces provide special moves within GIPF, and can be used to link the other games in the Project together. The reason the pieces are called potentials is because their special move only occurs if the piece reaches the center of the GIPF board, and, even then, the opposing player can challenge you to the game corresponding to the potential, and if the opposing player wins the special move is cancelled...

This greatly expands the possibilities of gameplay, and can also make for a day (or evening) of gaming, all centering around one game of GIPF.

Potentials for both ZERTZ and game #4 of the series, DVONN, can be found in Expansion Set #2

Here's a video explaining the game ~ although note the requirements to win specify one less marble of each type; this is the "blitz" variant of the rules:

ellyssian: (Default)


TZAAR - 2 players ages 8 and up

As I mentioned in my review of TAMSK, it's a bit like Pluto being stripped of its planethood, the way TAMSK was pulled out of
Project GIPF. Except, well, really, there are the possibility of legitimate reasosns in this case.

Anyway, I have a soft spot for ol' Pluto, and no less of one for TAMSK. Maybe more, on account of Pluto being too far away to stop by and play a game or two once in awhile. Or even to give me a call...

Any anyway, I had some brief feelings of annoyance at this whippitysnapper upstart of a game, jumping into the second slot of the Project well after all was allegedly said and done. These feelings were somewhat tempered by the known fact that Kris Brum designs a damn good abstract strategy game, and if he really wants to keep the Project capped at six games, who am I to tell him "Stop!" when a new game, that's sure to be great, is slid into the mix as an old one is put out to pasture.

I already wrote the lament for TAMSK, so we'll just get right on with it: this is a perfect fit with the other games in the project I have played, and it seems like it will be a good fit with the three I haven't yet played as well. It's as engaging as GIPF, the rules are easy enough to pick up, and I can see some strategic challenges arising.

In TZAAR, each player has thirt pieces that are, at the start of the game, laid out on the intersecting points of a hexagonal playing field. It's GIPF-like, but bigger, with a central non-playing area.

There are three types of playing pieces, and each player has six Tzaars, nine Tzarras, and fifteen Totts. You must have at least one piece of each type on the board, or else you will lose.

For all but the first player's first turn, there are two moves you can make each time. The first is a capture ~ simply land on top of an adjoining opposing piece, or one that is on an open straight line from your piece. Any of the three types may capture any other type ~ there is no weight to the individual types of playing pieces. The second move can be another capture, or you can choose to strengthen one of your own pieces.

You strengthen your piece by landing on top of another of your own pieces ~ using the same movement rules as a capture ~ and stack the two together. The top piece is the only piece in a stack that counts, so if you stack on top of your last remaining Tzarras, you'll end the game immediately in your opponent's favor.

You can stack as many pieces together as you want. Each stack can capture any piece or stack of the same or less height. A stack of four pieces can not take a stake of five pieces, for instance, but it can trounce on a single piece, or three piece stack.

Each turn, for that second move, you need to decide whether to make your opponent weaker with a second capture or to strengthen your pieces by stacking ~ it's a bit of an arms race, really.

In my first game with [profile] aequitaslevitas, we had that arms race coming up pretty quickly. Originally, I was content to stop at a small stack and just continue to try to get rid of his Tzaars. The race began when he made his last Tzaar a triple decker, and then higher. Before it got too out of hand, I had him, with his last two Tzarras, both single pieces, right in my sights, each threatened, by both a stack of two and a stack of four.

If he had made either one or the other larger, it still would have been within range of capture of those two pieces, and his monster stack of five or six was all the way across the board. That's definitely a time where two capture moves are called for, and it put him out of business.

All in all, a very fun game, and I look forward to learning more about the strategies that can be brought to bear.

Because this is a newer game, and because YouTube was invented, there's a video of the game's designer explaining how to play this, so you can see it for yourself:

ellyssian: (Default)


Labyrinth - 2-4 players ages 8 and up

This game's been around for a couple of decades, but I've never played it. I picked it out as something all the kids could play, including Mr. B. There is a flavor of the game out there for kids ( Junior Labyrinth, ages 5 and up) and an advanced version ( Master Labyrinth, ages 10 and up), but this one, rated for ages 8 and up, seemed the best fit. The Junior flavor has larger sized pieces, thus a smaller area of play, but looked to have the same mechanics. The Master game has a final dragon battle and guards and changes the mechanics a bit, thus making it not fit my purpose of entertaining Mr. B.

Still, before we played it, I wavered a bit and actually held off on bringing it out for a while. I finally decided to give it a go, and he picked it up without a problem. In fact, he won the game.

The game is played on a standard sized board, but most of the playing surface is made up of tiles, about two inches square, that are slid in from all four sizes. Some of the tiles ~ both the sliding ones and the stationary ones which act as guides ~ have treasures on them. There are cards with pictures of the different treasures, so language is not a part of the game play. The cards are divided amongst the players and kept in secret. You have to get your share of the treasures by traveling to them, in order.

You start each turn by sliding the extra piece into the board in a location of your choosing. You can then travel as far as you want in an attempt to get to the treasure. As the maze shifts with each turn, this can take some planning and some patience. Once you get all your treasures, you have to get back to your home location in one of the four corners. The first player to do so wins the game.

For Mr. B, we did make a few changes to the rules ~ we played the cards face up, so we could help explain to him where he needed to go, but I expect next time we'll be able to try the standard rules. To make this face-up variant work for a kid, we also tried to help ~ or, at least, to not hinder Mr. B ~ with the placement of our tiles, as well as providing him some advice.

It might not be a fit for the serious gamers out there (who sometimes really need to step back a bit and remember that gaming should be fun =), but it's definitely a good choice for a family game night. With a little help from the other players, you can stretch that age range down two or three years and the kids will have a blast.
ellyssian: (Default)


TAMSK

Including a review of this game is a bit of a tease... sure, I linked to the product on Funagain Games, and, sure, it's a great game... but it's also slightly out of print.

You see, TAMSK was the second game of Project GIPF, a series of abstract games designed by Kris Burm. To avoid going into too much detail about what an abstract game is, but since it's been so long since I reviewed the first game of the project, I'll point you to that review here so you can get some background on the subject. I'll wait here until you read that, unless you're already pretty familiar with what an abstract game is, and then you can just go ahead with this now.

There, back now? I will ammend that prior review by adding that Project GIPF has really got me hooked on abstract games, so, yeah, I'd have to say I'm a fan of them now.

Anyway, TAMSK is now out of Project GIPF, and it's been replaced ~ the game that replaced it, TZAAR, will be reviewed within a week or so. TAMSK was slated to be produced as a standalone game under a different name*, and I have hopes I'll be able to update this review at some time with a link to that product, because, as I noted it's a great game.

TAMSK is a two player game ~ I played with [profile] aequitaslevitas earlier today. It's fairly complex in construction (for the manufacturer; no assembly is required by the player, other than setting up pieces for gameplay), and there are conjectures about cost and complications of production that have led to its replacement in the project. There is a plastic hexagonal game board, 32 rings, two smaller plastic pieces to store rings for the start of the game, one 15 second sand timers, and six three minute sand timers.

The playing board has tubes of varying heights that hold one of the six timers ~ the pieces players move around the board ~ and one to four rings. To make a move, you turn the timer over and place it in an adjacent tube and you place a ring around the tube. Once the tube is filled to capacity with its allotment of one to four rings, you can not return to that location again ~ if you do, you automatically lose the game.

The object is to get rid of your 16 rings as fast as you can. The first player to get rid of all their rings first, or to get rid of as much of their rings before there are no valid moves left, wins.

Time is a key element in this game. At the start, you have three hourglasses to work with. If you allow one to run out, that piece becomes frozen, and you can no longer use it. You can trap pieces ~ that punk kid o' mine trapped me in our game today. Sealed me off before I realized what I was doing. Of course, he also let sand run out of his timer on his second move or so, so we were both down to two timers each.

Additional time pressure can be brought to the game by the use of the 15 second timer. It is played, optionally, during your opponents turn. If they fail to make their move before the sands run out, they lose their turn.

With all the time pressure, the game is extremely fast to play. The time pressure also prevents long strategic pondering ~ if you don't move fast, you're going to lose a turn or a playing piece. If you're down a piece it's very hard to catch up, as [profile] aequitaslevitas found out. I'm pretty sure those handful or two of turns I had when he was down one piece (before he trapped my third piece) was what turned the game in my favor. Although it was bad enough to see my piece taken out by his, it's worse when you trap yourself all on your own... and if you're trying to keep up with the pace, that's a very likely occurance!

If you can track this game down, I highly recommend it. It works great as a filler, and, despite how the astronomers game producers might have demoted Pluto TAMSK, it can still be used within the Project, as, indeed, any game can be brought in to GIPF through the use of potentials.**

Just like Pluto still keeps up its dance, no matter what those astronomers might have said about it behind its back...

~ ~ ~

* I say "was slated to be produced" because it was due out in 2008 and it's not here yet, to my knowledge.

** Three potentials, and rules, are included with at least some, if not all, of the editions of TAMSK. They're not likely to be included with the renamed TAMSK, as it will be out-of-Project, but they are available in the Project GIPF Expansion Set 1. I expect TZAAR will use the TAMSK potentials, as the TAMSK potentials are identical in appearance to the unpainted TZAAR pieces.

Avast Ye!

Sep. 19th, 2009 01:32 pm
ellyssian: (Default)
In honour of the day, we are watching documentaries about pirates!

First up, the second most accurate film about life at sea, that documentary, Muppet Treasure Island.

Later, we're likely to watch the (rather dry) but incredibly accurate and detailed biopic about Yellowbeard.

We might also watch Pirates, Hook, and Cutthroat Island.

There's also the Pirates of the Caribbean films:The Curse of the Black Pearl, Dead Man's Chest, and At World's End.

We could also open up to movies that have some piratical elements or take things off into outer space, as with The Ice Pirates, Treasure Planet, Castle in the Sky, The Goonies, or Porco Rosso.

Of course, there's also The Pirates Who Don't Do Anything for Mr. B.

~ ~ ~

We may also entertain ourselves by playing Pirate's Cove or Cartagena.

There's also the sequels to Cartagena, The Pirate's Nest, Die Goldinsel, and Die Mueterei, but I haven't played any of those yet.

~ ~ ~

So, what's everyone else doing for Talk Like a Pirate Day?
ellyssian: (sphinx)
Welcome to Monday's Thirteen, the movie quote guessing game.

Answers will be screened. Those who guess correctly will have their name listed with the quote as soon as I can. More than one person can claim a quote, so the movie's name won't be revealled until the weekend game-end.

On Wednesday, some additional hints will be posted for leftover Double Quotes (two-week veterans of the game). Any surviving Triple Quotes will get their hint from the prior week sorted out and matched up. Fridays will see any unguessed Triple Quotes matched with another quote.

Anything that makes it to four weeks is probably too difficult for you all to guess is a real challenge. It will be elevated to Sudden Death status - the first correct guess gets the credit for it, and, unlike earlier stages of the game, subsequent guesses just don't count for squat. Instead of waiting for the weekend, I'll expose the winners *and the movies* for Sudden Death quotes as soon as I can. Sudden Death quotes will also get the benefit of an extra quote Tuesday through Friday in an attempt to get rid of them and make room for something easier that you folks can handle new.

Enjoy!


Triple Quotes
1. "You got a bad attitude, pops. Lighten up before your arteries harden."
This movie is animated.


2. "I have been a law abiding citizen my whole life, and one day with you, I'm shooting... and breaking..." -- guessed by [livejournal.com profile] malinaldarose
This quote is spoken by Will Smith.


3. "Nothing is more reliable than a man whose loyalties can be bought with hard cash."
This quote is spoken to Johnny Depp.


4. "Do you know what it's like to remember everything?" -- guessed by [livejournal.com profile] blood_of_winter
This movie is based on a classic story.



Double Quotes:
5. "Remember Club Hell?"

Single Quotes:
6. "Hell of a situation we got here. Two on, two out, your team down a run and you've got the chance to be the hero on national television... if you don't blow it. Saw your wife last night. Great little dancer. That guy she was with? I'm sure he's a close personal friend, but tell me, what was he doing with her panties on his head?" -- guessed by [livejournal.com profile] feste_sylvain, [livejournal.com profile] celticboy, [livejournal.com profile] nea852

7. "...charging a man with murder in this place was like handing out speeding tickets in the Indy 500. I took the mission. What the hell else was I gonna do?"

8. "What-what the hell is a gigawatt?" -- guessed by [livejournal.com profile] nightwind292, [livejournal.com profile] malinaldarose, [livejournal.com profile] celticboy, [livejournal.com profile] nea852

9. "What the hell do ya think you're doin', Bulbhead? This floor used to be dirty enough to eat off of."

10. "Over? Did you say "over"? Nothing is over until we decide it is! Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor? Hell no!" -- guessed by [livejournal.com profile] feste_sylvain, [livejournal.com profile] nea852

11. "Hell sucks!"

12. "He says unless we accept his demands, the weather will keep getting colder and colder until we'll all have to go to hell just to warm up." -- guessed by [livejournal.com profile] malinaldarose, [livejournal.com profile] celticboy

13. "Some people call this hell, but you're still in Oklahoma Territory... Save your breath. I don't know who hung you are why, but if you're innocent, the judge will set you free. And if you're not, we'll have to take the trouble to hanging you again."
ellyssian: (sphinx)
Even with two weeks, we stayed stuck at 8 out of 13... not all that bad, but all of them were new quotes. That means all the double quotes from Episode Fourteen will be Triple Quotes in Episode Fifteen.

And, yeah, Episode Fifteen will be getting compiled very soon and will be posted some time on Monday! =)


6. "Good afternoon. We're gonna have a great jump today. Okay, first crank a hard cutback as you hit the wall. There's a screaming bottom curve, so watch out. Remember: rip it, roll it, and punch it." -- Finding Nemo, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] bookgirlwa, [livejournal.com profile] aequitaslevitas, [livejournal.com profile] nea852

7. "And remember... I'll eat anything you want me to eat. I'll swallow anything you want me to swallow. But, come on down and I'll... chew on a dog! Arroooo!" -- Beetlejuice, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] malinaldarose

8. "Just remember, when you want to come back, say 'Hopscotch.'" -- Tim Burton's Corpse Bride, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] shadowwolf13, [livejournal.com profile] nightwind292, [livejournal.com profile] nea852

9. "And tell them... tell them that when all is said and done, I only ask that people remember me by two simple words. [Stops to think] Any two, as long as they're simple." -- Elvira, Mistress of the Dark, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] shadowwolf13

10. "Hi, Max! Remember me? I'm Fred's hand! You wanna greet any other body parts? Remember, Max. You flush it. I flaunt it." -- Batman Returns (Two-Disc Special Edition), guessed by [livejournal.com profile] malinaldarose, [livejournal.com profile] phantom_wolfboy

11. "Well, I remember Mel Gibson accurately, and he didn't say that. That Polonius guy did." -- Clueless, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] 1_rhiannon_1, [livejournal.com profile] nightwind292, [livejournal.com profile] nea852

12. "So what? The important thing to remember is not to go to pieces when that happens. You have to react like a man, calmly. You have to say to yourself, 'Albert, you pierced the toast, so what? It's not the end of your life.'" -- The Birdcage, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] kay_brooke, [livejournal.com profile] shadowwolf13

13. "When was the last time you remember doing something during the day?" -- Dark City, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] kay_brooke
ellyssian: (sphinx)
Yeah. I don't have anything for today.

In absence of an Episode Fifteen (for this week!), I have at least sorted out the additional clues from last Wednesday.

Not that anyone's ever made a guess off the clues... there's a challenge for you!

There's still one lonely single quote left... and don't forget, even the ones that have been answered are still open. Answers will appear on the weekend.

Head on over to the latest episode to play! =)
ellyssian: (sphinx)
In no particular order, the Double Quotes get some help...

And going back to original form - on account of me not taking the time to grab four leetle quotes - I give you various facts about the four quotes, or the films they're featured in:

One of the quotes is spoken by Will Smith.

One of the movies is animated.

One of the movies is based on a classic story.

One of the quotes is spoken to Johnny Depp.


If you think you know any of them, head on over to the latest episode of Monday's Thirteen!
ellyssian: (sphinx)
Welcome to Monday's Thirteen, the movie quote guessing game.

Answers will be screened. Those who guess correctly will have their name listed with the quote as soon as I can. More than one person can claim a quote, so the movie's name won't be revealled until the weekend game-end.

On Wednesday, some additional hints will be posted for leftover Double Quotes (two-week veterans of the game). Any surviving Triple Quotes will get their hint from the prior week sorted out and matched up. Fridays will see any unguessed Triple Quotes matched with another quote.

Anything that makes it to four weeks is probably too difficult for you all to guess is a real challenge. It will be elevated to Sudden Death status - the first correct guess gets the credit for it, and, unlike earlier stages of the game, subsequent guesses just don't count for squat. Instead of waiting for the weekend, I'll expose the winners *and the movies* for Sudden Death quotes as soon as I can. Sudden Death quotes will also get the benefit of an extra quote Tuesday through Friday in an attempt to get rid of them and make room for something easier that you folks can handle new.

Enjoy!


Double Quotes:
1. "You got a bad attitude, pops. Lighten up before your arteries harden."
This movie is animated.


2. "I have been a law abiding citizen my whole life, and one day with you, I'm shooting... and breaking..."
This quote is spoken by Will Smith.


3. "Nothing is more reliable than a man whose loyalties can be bought with hard cash."
This quote is spoken to Johnny Depp.


4. "Do you know what it's like to remember everything?"
This movie is based on a classic story.


Single Quotes:
5. "Remember Club Hell?"

6. "Good afternoon. We're gonna have a great jump today. Okay, first crank a hard cutback as you hit the wall. There's a screaming bottom curve, so watch out. Remember: rip it, roll it, and punch it." -- Finding Nemo, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] bookgirlwa, [livejournal.com profile] aequitaslevitas, [livejournal.com profile] nea852

7. "And remember... I'll eat anything you want me to eat. I'll swallow anything you want me to swallow. But, come on down and I'll... chew on a dog! Arroooo!" -- Beetlejuice, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] malinaldarose

8. "Just remember, when you want to come back, say 'Hopscotch.'" -- Tim Burton's Corpse Bride, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] shadowwolf13, [livejournal.com profile] nightwind292, [livejournal.com profile] nea852

9. "And tell them... tell them that when all is said and done, I only ask that people remember me by two simple words. [Stops to think] Any two, as long as they're simple." -- Elvira, Mistress of the Dark, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] shadowwolf13

10. "Hi, Max! Remember me? I'm Fred's hand! You wanna greet any other body parts? Remember, Max. You flush it. I flaunt it." -- Batman Returns (Two-Disc Special Edition), guessed by [livejournal.com profile] malinaldarose, [livejournal.com profile] phantom_wolfboy

11. "Well, I remember Mel Gibson accurately, and he didn't say that. That Polonius guy did." -- Clueless, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] 1_rhiannon_1, [livejournal.com profile] nightwind292, [livejournal.com profile] nea852

12. "So what? The important thing to remember is not to go to pieces when that happens. You have to react like a man, calmly. You have to say to yourself, 'Albert, you pierced the toast, so what? It's not the end of your life.'" -- The Birdcage, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] kay_brooke, [livejournal.com profile] shadowwolf13

13. "When was the last time you remember doing something during the day?" -- Dark City, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] kay_brooke
ellyssian: (sphinx)
Not bad! I was kind of hoping for thirteen out of thirteen for this, the thirteenth episode, but hey... I'll take what I can get! =)

Sudden Death Quotes (first guess and they're gone!)
1. "A lion can raise a mouse, but the mouse is still a mouse. And you, Charlie, are that mouse. Look at this. He takes it. Chicken blood." -- Kangaroo Jack, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] nin_man
"I think I just sweated out a bottle of Yoo-hoo I drank in the eighth grade."


"My name is Carbone, which means skinny white boy with a gun."

"I never saw it. Such a beautiful animal. It's the national symbol of Australia. And I killed it."

"You mean to tell me that we traveled halfway across the world to pay for our own execution?"

"Throw me a friggin' bone, here! I have a son! I shall call him... Mini Roo!"

"... you degenerate moron. Were these Medieval Times and you, a knight in shining armor, you would have, I have no doubt, slayed the maiden and saved the dragon."

"I put the money in the jacket, and the jacket on the kangaroo, and now he's hopping away!"













Single Quotes:
2. "I'm chaos, and he's mayhem. We're a double act." -- Lethal Weapon 3, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] celticboy, [livejournal.com profile] malinaldarose, [livejournal.com profile] nursemae (partial credit), [livejournal.com profile] wintersweet

3. "'When Alexander saw the breadth of his domain, he wept for there were no more worlds to conquer.' The benefits of a classical education." -- Die Hard, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] celticboy, [livejournal.com profile] nin_man, [livejournal.com profile] malinaldarose, [livejournal.com profile] nea852

4. "I must have killed more men than Cecil B. DeMille." -- Blazing Saddles, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] nea852, [livejournal.com profile] nin_man

6. "I need someone who's *mechanically* minded, not some half-baked, swashbuckling Casanova wannabe!" -- Castle in the Sky, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] dreamingcrow, [livejournal.com profile] aequitaslevitas

10. "I hit him in the head with a frying pan and put him in the trunk... so he wouldn't get hurt." -- Who Framed Roger Rabbit, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] dreamingcrow, [livejournal.com profile] nightwind292, [livejournal.com profile] jasmine_koran, [livejournal.com profile] kay_brooke, [livejournal.com profile] nin_man, [livejournal.com profile] malinaldarose, [livejournal.com profile] nursemae, [livejournal.com profile] nea852, [livejournal.com profile] aequitaslevitas

11. A) "You were gonna take a bullet for me."
    B) "Actually, I was just counting on a lot of missing." -- Johnny Dangerously, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] aequitaslevitas

12. "Ah, just in time for a new century. You'll soon find your bearings, young Masbeth. The Bronx is up, the Battery is down, and home is this way." -- Sleepy Hollow, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] malinaldarose, [livejournal.com profile] 1_rhiannon_1, [livejournal.com profile] nea852

13. "Once more into the breach, my friends, once more. We'll close the wall with our dead. In peace, nothing so becomes a man as modesty and humility, but when the blast of war blows in our ears, then imitate the action of the tiger, summon up the blood, disguise fair nature with rage and lend the eye a terrible aspect." -- The Postman, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] dreamingcrow
ellyssian: (sphinx)
Only one eligible Sudden Death quote!

"I put the money in the jacket, and the jacket on the kangaroo, and now he's hopping away!"

If you think you know any of them, head on over to the latest episode of Monday's Thirteen!
ellyssian: (sphinx)
...Quote.

Sudden Death gets more help:

"... you degenerate moron. Were these Medieval Times and you, a knight in shining armor, you would have, I have no doubt, slayed the maiden and saved the dragon."

If you think you know it, put this quote out of its misery over at the latest episode of Monday's Thirteen!
ellyssian: (sphinx)
In a quite obvious order of one, the Sudden Death quote gets some help that we'll pretend I posted yesterday...

"Throw me a friggin' bone, here! I have a son! I shall call him... Mini Roo!"

If you think you know it, head on over to the latest episode of Monday's Thirteen!
ellyssian: (sphinx)
A bit of help for Sudden Death:

1. "You mean to tell me that we traveled halfway across the world to pay for our own execution?"

If you think you know it, put these quotes out of their misery over at the latest episode of Monday's Thirteen!

Top Sekrit Message Section:

[livejournal.com profile] nin_man: Not so much on your second guess. If you give me that movie with a different number or a different movie with that number than the situation might be different. I expect there may be a typo involved. =)

[livejournal.com profile] malinaldarose: re: the last guess: not so obvious! It's misquoting Mr. Billy, really. Or nearly-quoting him.

[livejournal.com profile] nea852: On that last one, you might think so, but see prior Top Sekrit hint.

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