ellyssian: (Default)
Ah! The ribs are prepped and cooking (and will continue to do so all day) and the coffee's made...

First time using the Keurig with the permanent filter instead of the pre-packaged K-cups. It works well, although was more of a pain to get the old grounds out than I expected (not sure why I expected wet coffee grounds not to stick to the far reaches of the tiny little filter... I've made coffee once or twice before, and with permanent filters no less...)

While I still have a bunch of K-cups left over from the sampler, I can easily do the permanent filter for my daily cup and save the others for when someone wants a non-decaf or I'm in more of a rush (not that it takes much longer to use the filter).

Errands now, attending a graduation party this evening. Maybe some guitar playing and/or writing in-between?
ellyssian: (Default)

  • ground beef, one handful per burger

  • granny smith apples, roughly one per two burgers

  • bacon

  • gorgonzola

  • extra sharp cheddar

  • maple sugar

  • fresh ground black pepper

  • white pepper

  • asiago cheese bagels



Disclaimer: I didn't use the cheddar. However, next time, I'll use a little bit, in thin strips, to melt into a glue. The gorgonzola doesn't have enough holding power, and the burger falls apart a bit.

Cook the bacon until it is just a little underdone. Drain it.

Slice apples into thin round slices, using the middle of each apple, cutting out the core. About two slices per finished burger. Dice the remaining apple(s).

Mix the ground beef, black and white pepper, about half the gorgonzola, cheddar, and maple sugar in a bowl. Rip up the bacon and mix it in.

Form patties and cook. I grill over an open flame when possible, otherwise I like to broil.

Slice and toast or grill the bagels.

Put the burgers on the bagels, top with the rest of the gorgonzola and two slices of apple each, then put the top on the burgers and serve.

If you use a 70/30 blend of burger, you won't need any sauces ~ it will be moist enough.
ellyssian: (Default)


Preheat oven to 350F.

Bring 2 cups of water, a bit of oil, and a few grindings of sea salt to a boil in a medium saucepan, reduce to simmer and add barley & brown rice, cover and simmer for 45 minutes.

Mix ground beef and a liberal sprinkling of maple pepper, some basil, and ground rosemary in a metal sauce pan and allow to stand.

Prepare one or two pans with foil, and lay out the bacon in a single layer. Bake until desired crispness is reached ~ I like a mix of somewhat flexible to pretty crisp. Drain bacon on a rack, then sandwich in layers of paper towels to absorb grease.

Mix chopped onion into hamburger.

Crumble/tear bacon and mix into hamburger. Bacon will probably still be hot, so be careful.

Add barley and rice and, you guessed it, mix into hamburger. Grains are exceedingly hot, so use a fork to stir things up. Some of the water wasn't absorbed by the barley and rice, and it went into the mix.

Form into loafs in (a) baking dish(es). We used 3 aluminum foil loaf pans, maybe 3x3x9? Press it down to compact it a bit.

Pour maple syrup over the top of each loaf.

Bake uncovered for 40 minutes.

Water remained in each pan after serving, so this was exceptionally moist. I considered keeping the water out of the mix, but I felt it did a decent job of reducing the fat from the beef.

Sigh

Sep. 21st, 2009 04:10 pm
ellyssian: (Default)
Back to lighting the gas grill with incense sticks...

Long matches work, sort of, maybe 2-10 required before one doesn't get blown out.

But we've been out of long matches for most of this year.

The old starter seems to still have its spark. Sort of. The two burners in the grill haven't lit that way all year. The burner on the outside, that I almost never use, works fine of course.

We had a long match lighter. It lit maybe twice, and, since it was made to resemble a match, it had a big red bulb at the end that's too big to get the flame anywhere near the burner.

For part of this year, we had a long lighter that worked.

It just ran out of fuel.

I'm not sure if it's refillable, and, in any case, we don't have any here.

So...

It's back to a small lighter getting an active flame on the incense stick, and then shoving that in to light the burners.

Oy.

Fortunate

Jun. 26th, 2009 11:02 pm
ellyssian: (Default)
Deb says, as she's opening a fortune cookie, "It would be great if it had a hundred dollar bill in it!"

Instead, her cookie tells her: "It isn't worth anything unless you earn it"


This is even better than the time I was working on the duplex printing of report cards and IPRs for Lynn, MA and received the fortune: "DDDUUUPPPLLLEEEXXX IS BROKEN"

Garage Sale

Jun. 6th, 2009 09:14 pm
ellyssian: (Default)
We've been here six years, and we finally managed to get some stuff out for the neighborhood yard sale.

We did pretty good ~ three figures, when I figured we might make enough to get some Gourmet Food for lunch. Of course, even Burger King costs $25 dollars to feed four these days (Deb prefers that Other fast food place, so she abstained, which is probably a healthier thing to do).

We sold about half of our VHS tapes, so we've got some goods for next year's sale. We also moved three car seats, a bunch of Little People, some Hot Wheels, two trikes, and Rachel's little bike.

I would have liked to have carried less stuff back up to the house afterwards, though...
ellyssian: (Default)


Prep the salad ingredients, make the onion straws and cod pieces.

Heat 2 tbsp of the dressing (or so) in a small saucepan over very low (as low as you can go) heat. I simmered it while the fish fried, turned the heat off, and left it there until the onion straws were done, and it was perfect. A bit of heat brings out the sweetness in the dressing; it's not necessarily served hot, though.

This is best done in individual size servings ~ I wouldn't advise putting this in a big bowl and tossing it.

Add a few onion straws, then the lettuce, spinach, and carrots. Mix that up a bit. Add some more onion straws, and a few pieces of the fish. Top with the cheese and drizzle with the dressing.

As mentioned with the cod pieces recipe, beer battered might be the way to go... although the onion straws held up well with the dressing and veggies, the fish seemed to get soggier. A battered coating may prevent that.
ellyssian: (Default)
  • 2 large cod filets (or haddock or flounder or any other white fish, really, although if you use something else, you lose the clever word play in the title, which means a possibly more appetizing title, which means less fish for you)
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 cup white flour
  • 3/4 cup wheat flour
  • 1/4 cup corn meal
  • chipotle chile powder
  • fresh ground black pepper
  • 1 quart canola oil


And yes - if you make this with the onion straws, the recipe is the same. Next time, I may do a beer battered fish, but this was done to keep the flour mix identical.

~ ~ ~

Mix milk with lemon juice. Let stand 10-15 minutes. Or spend more money to buy fake buttermilk that is made pretty much the same way. Or spend even more money and buy traditional buttermilk.

~ ~ ~

Slice cod filets into narrow strips, cutting each in half at the spine.

Place in a glass dish.

Pour buttermilk over the onion.

Allow to sit for 1 hour.

~ ~ ~

Mix flours together.

Add spices. Go heavy on the black pepper, it's better that way.

I also added some ground white pepper and a pinch or two of tarragon, but the latter was inconsequential and the former works just as well as more ground pepper.

~ ~ ~

Pre-heat canola oil in saute pan, dutch oven, or other appropriate container, to 350 degrees.

Pick up fish from buttermilk, drop into the flour mix.

Shake the extra flour off, drop the coated onions in the oil.

By the time you mix the next batch of milky fish bits in the flour, the ones in the oil will be ready to be turned (unless you use enough oil to cover them).

Cook them a lot less on the second side.

Place on a paper towel to drain.
ellyssian: (Default)
  • 1 large white onion
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 cup white flour
  • 3/4 cup wheat flour
  • 1/4 cup corn meal
  • chipotle chile powder
  • fresh ground black pepper
  • 1 quart canola oil



Mix milk with lemon juice. Let stand 10-15 minutes. Or spend more money to buy fake buttermilk that is made pretty much the same way. Or spend even more money and buy traditional buttermilk.

~ ~ ~

Slice onion in half, root to tip. If you feel you can slice in mid-air, without support, go ahead; I did that with the first onion and it didn't work so well.

Place the onion half freshly-cut side down. Starting at the tip, slice as thin as you can and still have the knife somewhere near the onion. You should be able to see the knife through the onion.

Repeat with the other half.

~ ~ ~

Separate onion bits and place in a large glass dish.

Pour buttermilk over the onion.

Allow to sit for 1 hour.

~ ~ ~

Mix flours together.

Add spices. Go heavy on the black pepper, it's better that way.

I also added some ground white pepper and a pinch or two of tarragon, but the latter was inconsequential and the former works just as well as more ground pepper.

~ ~ ~

Pre-heat canola oil in saute pan, dutch oven, or other appropriate container, to 350 degrees.

Pick up onions from buttermilk, drop into the flour mix.

Shake the extra flour off, drop the coated onions in the oil.

By the time you mix the next batch of milky onions in the flour, the ones in the oil will be cooked.

They go real quick, so keep an eye on them.

Place on a paper towel to drain.

~ ~ ~

Make sure you eat them before anyone else realizes they're ready. Or make two onions worth, which is what I did.

Also, for best results, use one set of tongs in the milk/onion mix, another in the flour, and a third (I used a metal slotted spoon for this one) to scoop them from the oil. I'm thinking of getting some metal mesh screened pans to shake more of the excess flour off before they go in the oil; the excess sludge really drops the temperature of the oil pretty quickly. Any ideas on keeping that to a limited quantity would be welcome!
ellyssian: (Default)
I've never had foie gras.

I'm not even sure it would be something I'd like.

But I don't think it should be something forbidden, something removed from the menu, because that would be giving in to the terrorists.

Check out this piece from Incanto Restaurant of San Francisco.

It boggles me that someone who would protest the violence they imagine they'd feel if the technique of gavage was used on them (which doesn't have the same physiological effect on the birds as it would on a human) would indulge in violence and destruction ~ right there, at that point, even had I agreed with them on all other aspects of their purpose, they have lost any possibility of support from me completely.

It is never right to protest violence with violence.
ellyssian: (Default)
This recipe has been posted before, and to celebrate the inclusion of pictures, there's been a slight variation added in for the occasion.

  • 1 lb. bacon (Hatfield Applewood Smoked, in this instance)
  • 6 medium-largish baking potatoes (adjust to more or less based on size; 7 were used here)
  • olive oil in spray bottle
  • 16 oz. extra sharp Wisconsin yellow cheddar
  • 8 oz. Monterrey Jack
  • 2 bunches scallions
  • fresh ground black pepper
  • 1 tbsp. tarragon
  • 1 tbsp. chervil
  • 2 tbsp. tarragon vinegar
  • 1/4 cup dry white wine
  • 2 crushed white peppercorns
  • unsalted butter


Constructions and pictures under the cut! )

Enjoy!

Deeper n' Ever - Ready to Serve

Profile

ellyssian: (Default)
Everett

July 2014

S M T W T F S
  12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags